5 Ways to Make Your Kitchen More Sustainable


May 22, 2017 | Food Lion
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You may roll your eyes a bit when you hear the phrase: "Make your kitchen more sustainable." We get it. You're already busy enough in the kitchen—not to mention working your way through all thousand and one daily tasks—to focus on changing habits and worrying about sustainability.

But, we're not talking about major reinventions, cork flooring your kitchen type of sustainability. No, there's simple, headache-free ways to make sure you're making a difference for our planet—and often, your wallet.

Here are just a few hassle-free tips.

  1. Switch to cast iron pots and pans. These super heavy puppies are built to last generations, so your kids may one day be cooking their family dinners with them. They also make for quick cleanups, as they're naturally non-stick. But if that doesn't sell you, maybe this will: cast iron isn't treated with chemical surface sprays, which means they're healthier to cook in. You'll love them so much, you might even find you're cooking at home more than ever!
  2. Ditch the wrap. No, we're not crazy: kitchen life is totally possible without that handy-dandy aluminum foil. For less than $30, pick up a set of washable, lidded glass storage containers. Not only will they keep your leftovers fresh, they'll last for years.
  3. But what about that half of grapefruit, or the family favorite banana bread, you ask? Try beeswax-covered wrapping sheets—washable, reusable canvas sheets that can last for years!
  4. Go tea-bag-less. Many tea bags are now made of nylon, which is rough on the environment, since they don't break down in a landfill. Switching to loose tea skirts the issue. And by adjusting the amount of tea we use for our morning cup, you can also save a few bucks.
  5. Invest in cloth. Paper towels definitely have their uses, but dishtowels can take on almost all of paper's tasks. Hunt down the thick, absorbent ones in the kitchen supply aisle and use them for mopping up spills, drying lettuces—even picking up hot pots when you can't find a potholder.
  6. Buy in bulk. There are items every kitchen uses up more than others. Not only can you save money buy purchasing everything from nuts to legumes to dried fruit snacks from the bulk bins, you cut down on the plastic containers you need to recycle.

Extra Pro tip: Want to use plastic even less? Reuse the bags you bring your bounty home in the next time you shop!